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Books published in the last year

Latest publications

The Cricket Statistician No. 183: Autumn 2018

Jonathan Joy: Local Hero (part 2) – Aidan Haile

A Bat, a Ball, and a Wicket – Matthew Smith

What Ted Heath thought of Dolly – Mark Rowe

Tenth-wicket partnerships over 25% of the total score – Peter Huxford

Cricket in John Bullokar’s An English Expositor – Timothy J McCann

Sandford Schultz, England Cricketer – Philip Paine

The Bodyline Leak – David Frith

Best-attended County Grounds for T20 matches 2003-2017 – Andrew Thomas

A University Match – Simon Sweetman

Test Match Double-Hundreds by 21 – Simon Sweetman

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Whites On Green: A history of cricket at St Helen’s, Swansea

by Bob Harragan & Andrew Hignell

It is the only county cricket ground in the United Kingdom where you can both see the sea and feel the breeze coming off the adjoining estuary – the St Helen’s ground in Swansea where some memorable days in cricket history have thrilled the crowds shoe-horned into the tiered enclosures lining the boundaries at one of county cricket’s most idiosyncratic venues.

It was at the Swansea ground where Glamorgan secured a dramatic two-day victory over the 1951 South Africans; where the guile and spin of Johnnie Clay confounded and becalmed Australian batting legend Don Bradman; where during the late 1940s, John Arlott sat in the BBC radio commentary box, alongside Swansea’s favourite son, the famed poet Dylan Thomas; where in 1976 West Indian legend Clive Lloyd struck the world’s fastest double-hundred; where Matthew Maynard struck an astonishing hundred on first-class debut in 1985; where Glamorgan defeated the Australians on successive tours in 1964 and 1968; and where – during the latter season – Garry Sobers became the first man in cricket history to hit six sixes in an over.

This book is the fifth in the highly acclaimed Cricket Witness series and its publication, during the summer of 2018, celebrates the 50th anniversary of Sobers’ feat at the Swansea ground against the occasional spin of Malcolm Nash. Besides recounting all of these feats, and a number of other memorable occasions in cricket history at St Helen’s, this book also traces the creation during the second half of the 19th century of the ground – used by Swansea’s cricket and rugby teams – and its integral place in Welsh sporting history. Lavishly illustrated with many hitherto unpublished photographs, this book will appeal to local historians as well as aficionados of the summer game, besides showing how popular outgrounds and cricket festivals have been in the county cricket calendar.

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Tom Emmett: The Spirit of Yorkshire Cricket

by Jeremy Lonsdale

Lord Hawke called Tom Emmett ‘the greatest “character” who ever stepped onto the field’. In the 1860s, he once took 16 wickets for Yorkshire in an afternoon. In the 1870s, only one other player scored over 4,000 runs and took over 400 wickets in English cricket: WG Grace. Emmett had his best ever season with the ball in the 1880s, aged nearly 45. In all first-class cricket, he took over 1,500 wickets at under 14, bowling in an idiosyncratic style which included wides and balls ‘which no man had ever seen or dreamed of before’.

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The Cricket Statistician No. 182: Summer 2018

2018 AGM Minutes

Playing not watching – Matthew Smith

The International Cavaliers 1965-1968 – Terence Crosby

Paul Henry Foley (part 2) – Andrew Thomas

Carried his bat at Melbourne – David M Smith

The truth, the half-truth, and nothing like the truth – Douglas Miller

Eleven at a blow – Simon Sweetman

A century in each innings (rediscovered) – Roger Long

William Blackburne (part 1) – Michael Pulford

A guide to cricket in Baily’s Magazine (part 7) – Richard Lawrence

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Young Bradman

Written by Mark Rowe

How did Donald Bradman do it? He had an ‘eye’ for the ball; he could concentrate, and had an appetite for runs. Yet it’s one thing to have the ability, and another to have a chance to prove it. Hence Bradman called his rise an ‘adventure’, from being talent-spotted, invited to nets at the Sydney Cricket Ground aged 18, in October 1926, to first Test selection in November 1928.

Few have considered the sociology of 1920s small town Australia and Sydney’s volunteer enthusiasts that made the time and place ideal for a Bradman. His story speaks to us still. That no batsman has been as extraordinary as Bradman since (despite the prediction of Sir Neville Cardus) begs questions about questions and the ‘academies’ of elite sport. If an uncoached small lad from a small town with no more than a keen family background in sport could do it, why hasn’t anyone else?

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Women at the Wicket: A History of Women’s Cricket in Interwar England

Written by Adam McKie

Foreword by Alison Mitchell

As the golden age of men’s cricket came crashing to an end during the summer of 1914, it unexpectedly marked the beginning of women’s mass adoption of the national game. Women eagerly responded to the country’s wartime plea for help, but as they entered the factories, depots and factories of England, few anticipated they would also enter the cricket field. From a handful of wealthy, country-house teams before the war, by 1939 the sport had been transformed. International tours, first-class county venues, crowds in their thousands, and a substantial rise in playing numbers: women’s cricket became a permanent and widespread feature of the English summer. But their physical liberation was not without liberation, and accusations of being ‘unsexed’, uncivilised and manly doggedly pursued the sport. Just as players began to earn the respect and admiration of the public, the Second World War intervened, and women’s cricket became another casualty of the conflict.

The fourth volume in the Cricket Witness series, this book is the first in-depth study of the formative years of the game, and places the sport within broader changes in women’s education, employment, and civil rights, and argues cricket was a new setting for women’s emancipation after achieving electoral equality in 1928.

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The Minor Counties Championship 1912

Edited by Julian Lawton Smith

This is the latest issue in the well-regarded series on Minor County cricket during the late 19th and early 20th centuries which provides a wealth of information not readily available elsewhere. This volume contains full scorecards for every Minor County game staged in the 1912 season, together with end-of-season and career averages. Detailed statistical information is given on the players who took part in these matches and on the season as a whole, whilst there are also updates and amendments to previous books in the series.

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Enid Bakewell: Coalminer's Daughter

by Simon Sweetman

Enid Bakewell, one of England’s most successful and distinguished women cricketers, was the first women player to have an article about her in Wisden, in 1970, after an outstanding tour of Australasia. She is now the first female subject in the ACS Lives in Cricket series.

Simon Sweetman takes us through Enid’s playing career as an all-rounder and off the field as teacher and coach; and daughter, wife and mother. Articulate, approachable and a woman with firm roots in Nottinghamshire who has made friends across the world, she and her generation were true pioneers: when playing for the first time at Lord’s, they didn’t know if women would be allowed into the changing rooms.

Will she manage to play until she’s 80? Do not bet against it.

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The Cricket Statistician No. 181: Spring 2018

A guide to cricket in Baily’s Magazine (part 6) – Richard Lawrence

William Blackburne (part 2) – Michael Pulford

Modern batsmen – Chris Overson

300 runs in a match – Roger Long

Cricket in London society in the 17th century – Aidan Haile

In defence of Bruce Harris – Mark Rowe

Early FA Cup finals at The Oval: no pictures? – Philip Paine

Most in a month: the final story – Keith Walmsley

Paul Henry Foley (part 1) – Andrew Thomas

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First-Class Matches: Pakistan 1975/76 to 1979/80

Edited by John Bryant

This is the fourth publication in an ACS series that covers first-class scorecards not previously available in book form. With this volume, the series turns its attention to a particularly ill-documented period of the history of cricket in Pakistan.

It contains a full scorecard for each of the 266 first-class matches that took place during the five seasons 1975/76 to 1979/80, together with a brief narrative introducing each season’s cricket.

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ACS International Cricket Year Book 2018

Edited by Philip Bailey

The 33rd edition of the Year Book provides detailed information about every current player worldwide, listing all those who appeared in any First-Class, List A Limited-Overs or Twenty20 match in the 2016/17 and 2017 seasons. Women taking part in international matches are also included. Each player has an entry giving their biographical details as well as their full career records, plus statistics for the past season in every major form of the game in which they competed.

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2018 First-Class Counties Second Eleven Annual

Edited by Howard Clayton

This ever-popular book is a collation of potted scores for all of the Second Eleven Championship, Trophy and Twenty20 matches which were played during the 2017 season, plus player biographies, comprehensive averages and statistical highlights, as well as details of the major friendly games played by each Second Eleven. It remains a unique source of information about emerging county players and others who are still to break through into the first-class game. A detailed listing of all the grounds used in 2017 is once again provided, together with an A-Z index of players.

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The Daffodil Blooms: The glorious rise of Glamorgan CCC to County Champions in 1948

Written by Brian Halford & Andrew Hignell

The third book in the Cricket Witness series is a celebration of Glamorgan winning the 1948 County Championship. Not only was it their first-ever title, it was achieved just four years after the heartbreak of losing their inspirational captain, Maurice Turnbull, who was killed shortly after the Normandy invasion whilst serving King and Country. Maurice had steered the county through a series of difficult seasons when defeats were more common than success, and the committee was regularly contemplating a return to Minor County status.

Elevated into first-class cricket in 1921, Glamorgan CCC were the Cinderella of the county game, with opponents travelling to South Wales only booking two nights’ accommodation instead of the normal three, given the Welsh county’s dreadful form. As defeat followed defeat during their first two decades, Glamorgan’s selection committee often found it difficult to raise a strong team, as talented amateurs declined invitations to play, and, in 1922, they had to draft in a virtually unknown 15-year-old schoolboy for what proved to be his one and only county game.

There were also calls for the debt-ridden club to wind up but, to the delight of their loyal band of supporters, they continued, and in 1948 Wilf Wooller, the former Welsh rugby international, led the county to the Championship title.

Like other volumes in the series, this rags-to-riches tale is recounted with the use of contemporary quotes and extracts from the memoirs of the players themselves. This book is also lavishly illustrated with many previously unpublished images to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the club’s first Championship-winning season and a special moment in Welsh sporting history.

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The Cricket Statistician No. 180: Winter 2017

A guide to cricket in Baily’s Magazine (part 5) – Richard Lawrence

ICC Classification of Official Cricket – David Kendix

John Joy: local hero (part 1) – Aidan Haile

More on Jim Westray – David Frith

Skinner revealed – Keith Walmsley

Overseas Test players educated in the UK – Philip Defriez

Hit wicket – Jim Higgs

One day in Mr Warren’s paddock – George Thomas

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The Cricket Statistician No. 179: Autumn 2017

The diary of Thomas Marchant (part 1) – Aidan Haile

Slowest Ashes centuries – Jim Gibb

The other O’Reilly – David Frith

Gerald Smithson in 1947 (part 2) – Michael Pulford

A guide to cricket in Baily’s Magazine (part 4) – Richard Lawrence

Mosts in a calendar month – Keith Walmsley

Fresh light on the Duke of Dorset – Timonthy J. McCann

Cricketer and bank robber – John Pullin

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The Cricket Statistician No. 178: Summer 2017

Minutes of the 2017 AGM

England v Australia: the fastest Test centuries – Jim Gibb

The foundation of the Hambledon Club (part 1) – Ian Maun

The secret love of the draw – Bernard Whimpress

Gerald Smithson in 1947: a quite remarkable summer (part 1) – Michael Pulford

A guide to cricket in Baily’s Magazine (part 3) – Richard Lawrence

Almost as fast as Tyson: memories of David Sayer – Derek Barnard

Maurice Leyland: the Harrogate years – Mark Rowe

England’s Test captains and their counties – Paul Dyson

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All Ten: The Ultimate Bowling Feat

Written by Chris Overson

For a bowler, taking all ten wickets in an innings is the ultimate statistical feat. It is also a very rare one: in nearly 60,000 first-class matches it has been achieved only 81 times.

All Ten chronicles each of them, from Edmund Hinkly’s at Lord’s in 1848 to Zulfiqar Babar’s at Multan 161 years later, with match descriptions, scorecards and much more besides.

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Cricket and Cannons: Witness of the Game during the Crimean Campaign

Written by David Shimwell

The second book in the Cricket Witness series covers the playing of cricket during the Crimean War, looking at games which took place in Malta as the troops assembled, in camps in the Ottoman Empire as the troops were in transit to the Crimea, and during the engagements, the battles and siege of Sevastopol.

This book, deftly combining military and cricket history, provides a fascinating and original insight into cricket taking place in the mid-Victorian era.

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ACS Overseas First-Class Annual 2017

Edited by John Bryant

The ninth edition of the ACS Overseas First-Class Annual maintains the Association’s commitment to ensuring that all first-class scorecards are available in print. It contains full scores of all matches played throughout the world in 2016/17, together with matches played outside England and Wales in the 2017 season – over 600 scorecards in all. Also incorporating a brief narrative covering each ICC Full Member nation and final tables for the various domestic competitions – including, for the first time, the Irish Inter-Provincial Championship – the Annual provides unique coverage of the contemporary first-class game.

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First-Class Matches: India 2005/06 and 2006/07

Edited by John Bryant

This is the third publication in a series, undertaken by the ACS in response to comments from members, which covers first-class scorecards not previously available in book form.

This volume contains a full scorecard for each of the 195 first-class matches that took place during the Indian seasons 2005/06 and 2006/07, together with a brief narrative and the Ranji and Duleep Trophy tables for each season.

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Class Peace: An Analysis of Social Status and English Cricket 1846-1962

Written by Eric Midwinter

This is the first title in the Association’s new series, Cricket Witness.

Eric Midwinter’s volume explores a number of fascinating themes in cricket history around the social status of those who played the game. As readers of this scholarly work will appreciate, in cricket, as in society at large, there was ‘class peace’ rather than class war.

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