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From August until 31 October, we are offering a selection of 14 12 books at discounted prices (including postage and packing). Any of these titles which remain unsold in November will be disposed of

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ACS Overseas First-Class Annual 2014

SALE – UK price £19, overseas price inc postage £38

Edited by John Bryant

Now in its sixth year, the ACS Overseas First-Class Annual provides full scores of the more than 600 first-class matches played throughout the world during the 2013/14 overseas season. It also includes the handful of matches played overseas during both the 2013 and 2014 English seasons.

Price: £ 65.00
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William Clarke: The Old General

SALE – UK price £4, overseas price inc postage £8

By Peter Wynne-Thomas

Born in Nottingham in 1798, William Clarke was an effective slow bowler of his time, hanging onto his old under-arm ways well after round-arm styles had been developed. His skill was such – he took nearly 800 wickets in first-class matches – that pamphlets were published on how to counter his wiles.

In the spring of 1846 his second marriage broke down. He left Trent Bridge and set up the All-England Eleven as a commercial enterprise, hiring the best players of the day. For ten summers his team travelled around Britain like a circus, often on the newly built railways, to play fixtures (arranged through the new Penny Post) against eighteens and twenty-twos in industrial cities and old county towns. Crowds came, and moreover paid, to watch local players take on the big names of the game.

Of course there were disputes along the way – and there can be little doubt that Clarke liked a good argument. The established elites didn’t like it, and rival Elevens grew up. He may have failed to make the fortune often alleged, but by the time he died, aged 57, cricket had become the most popular ball-game in Britain to play, watch and read about.

Peter Wynne-Thomas tells the tale of a man who, like Kerry Packer, single-handedly changed the face of the known cricket world.

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W.E.Astill: All-rounder debonair

SALE – UK price £4, overseas price inc postage £8

By Antony Littlewood

Ewart Astill was not only an outstanding all-rounder who amassed more than 2,000 wickets and very nearly 20,000 runs over 30 years with his native county, Leicestershire; he was also a person of thorough honesty, decency, kindness, cheerfulness, determination and loyalty.

Only four players have scored more runs for Leicestershire and none took more wickets. One of only two cricketers who appeared in every season between the Wars, Astill played a record 628 first-class matches for his county and achieved the double of 1,000 runs and 100 wickets in a season no fewer than nine times.

To the Leicestershire faithful, he was the youngster of enormous promise and then the evergreen post-war veteran, who even more than his colleague George Geary shouldered the burden of their county’s bowling, and often their batting too, with a smiling chivalry and unwearied dedication that embedded him deep in their affections.

Astill was one of nine first-class cricketers who achieved the 20,000 runs/2,000 wickets double, and his meagre total of nine caps for England – all abroad – probably reflected Leicestershire’s perceived status as an ‘unfashionable’ county, rather than his playing ability.

Off the field, Astill was a hugely popular figure, a champion billiards player, a fine musician and an accomplished vocalist. He was frequently invited by leading representative teams to tour overseas and was seemingly the life and soul of the party off the field.

Fred Root called him the most versatile cricketer he had ever known and David Frith’s opinion was that ‘Of the stalwarts who served their countries for almost a lifetime, Ewart Astill has an exalted place.’ But for Leicestershire supporters, he was simply the best-loved of all their heroes.

Price: £ 14.00
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The Minor Counties Championship 1908

SALE – UK price £4.50, overseas price inc postage £9

Edited by Julian Lawton Smith

Full scorecards, seasonal averages and records and much more.

Price: £ 16.00
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2014 First-Class Counties Second Eleven Annual

SALE – UK price £3.50, overseas price inc postage £7

Potted scores for all Second Eleven Championship, Trophy and Twenty20 matches played during 2013, plus player biographies, comprehensive averages and statistical highlights, details of major friendly games, and all grounds used during the season.

Price: £ 12.00
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ACS International Cricket Year Book 2014

SALE – UK price £9, overseas price inc postage £18

Edited by Philip Bailey

The 29th edition of the ACS Year Book provides 488 pages of detailed information about every player worldwide who appeared in First-Class, List A Limited-Overs, Twenty20 or women’s international cricket in the 2012/13 and 2013 seasons.

Price: £ 30.00
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First-Class Cricket Matches 1948

SALE – UK price £7.50, overseas price inc postage £15

This volume in the ACS Green scores series provides the full scorecards of all first-class matches played worldwide in the 1947/48 and 1948 seasons.

Price: £ 26.00
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Frank Mitchell: Imperial Cricketer

SALE – UK price £4, overseas price inc postage £8

By Anthony Bradbury

Frank Mitchell in the late Victorian and Edwardian eras was a shining sporting
star who dazzled all too briefly. Whilst showing great potential at cricket as a
mature undergraduate, he reached the ultimate position in rugby when still at
Cambridge in becoming captain of the England XV.

Cricket, though, was a more abiding interest. Mitchell achieved some
notoriety through his actions as captain of Cambridge in the Varsity match
of 1896, when he sought to avoid the Oxford XI having to follow-on by
instructing his bowler to bowl no balls and wides. His earlier attacking style
had already brought him, as a Yorkshireman, to the attention of Lord Hawke,
with much of his limited first-class cricket then being played for Yorkshire.
Hawke gave him a place on his tour to South Africa in 1898/99, which made
Mitchell, retrospectively, an English Test cricketer. He served with the army
during part of the Boer War and, after a wonderful season back with Yorkshire
in 1901, he emigrated to South Africa.

Working for Abe Bailey, the South African entrepreneur, led Mitchell to captain
the South African team to England in 1904 which, though playing no official
Tests, had a successful tour. Thereafter he worked as a stockbroker, but a
surprise recall as captain of the South African team for the Triangular Tour of
1912 caused more controversy.

Without much personal income, Mitchell struggled with the requirements
of amateurism, but he again joined the army in 1914, rising to the rank of
Lieutenant-Colonel. Later he made a living from the precarious tin industry
in Nigeria and from writing frequent columns for The Cricketer. Some of the
aspirations expressed in his articles would remain welcome today. Frank
Mitchell was a man of many parts, whose contributions to English and South
African sport made him for short periods a notable hero.

Price: £ 14.00
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First-Class Cricket Matches 1947

SALE – UK price £7.50, overseas price inc postage £15

This volume of the ACS Green scores series provides the full scorecards of all first-class matches played worldwide in the 1946/47 and 1947 seasons.

Price: £ 26.00
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Eric Rowan: The Toughest Springbok

SALE – UK price £3.50, overseas price inc postage £7

By Rick Smith

One of South Africa’s finest batsmen in the first half of the 20th century, Eric Rowan will always be remembered for his cocky and fiercely combative approach to every match in which he played. A highly courageous player, he was prepared to take on Lindwall and Miller at their fastest without the benefit of either gloves or box. To him the very thought of a helmet and other modern protective gear would have been anathema.

No stranger to conflict, he sat down on the pitch when a Lancashire crowd barracked him for slow scoring, was controversially omitted from South Africa’s 1947 tour of England and had his Test career ended by the South African Cricket Association for non-cricketing reasons.

Using a variety of sources and photographs from the Brian Bassano Collection, Rick Smith describes the career of this South African whose approach to cricket would have been very much at home in the modern era.

In a Test career lasting from 1935 to 1951, Eric Rowan scored 1,965 runs at an average of 43.66. In 1951, aged 42, he made 236 against England at Leeds, which was then South Africa’s highest individual score in a Test match. He is still the oldest cricketer to score a Test double-century. Durable to the end, Eric’s career ended in the 1953/54 season when he was not far short of his 45th birthday.

Price: £ 13.00
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A.N.Hornby: The Boss

SALE – UK price £3.50, overseas price inc postage £7

By Stuart Brodkin

Albert Neilson Hornby was a sporting legend, captaining England and Lancashire at cricket and England at Rugby Union. He was also a useful footballer, appearing for Blackburn Rovers, and a keen boxer and hurdler. He regularly rode to hounds and was a decent shot.

The man known as ‘Monkey’ for his diminutive size as a youngster and his hyper-active demeanour carved out one of the most durable careers in the game. For five decades he ruled the roost at Lancashire as player, captain, chairman and president. In his heyday it was said that only W.G.Grace was his superior as a batsman, and his captaincy was admired even by the Australians! He was also a brilliant fielder.

Hornby will be remembered as the captain who lost the famous Oval Test of 1882 to the Australians, a defeat which gave birth to the Ashes, and also went down in cricketing folklore as one of the central figures in Francis Thompson’s poem ‘At Lord’s’.

As a captain, he demanded the utmost loyalty from those who played under him and, in return, defended his players to the hilt, most notably when a number of Lancashire bowlers were accused of throwing. He was one of the central figures when a disputed umpiring decision led to the Sydney riot of 1879, and there were other occasions when he was not afraid to wade into a crowd of unruly spectators.

Had he been alive today, Hornby would have been the darling of the tabloids. In his lifetime, during the Golden Age of cricket, he was never far away from controversy and confrontation.

Price: £ 11.00
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First-Class Cricket Matches 1946

SALE – UK price £7.50, overseas price inc postage £15

The ACS Green scores series advances beyond the Second World War to provide the full scorecards of all first-class matches played worldwide in the 1945/46 and 1946 seasons.

Price: £ 26.00
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